test

First First Day of School: How to Get Your Child Ready for Kindergarten

You did it, parents. You got through the grueling newborn and toddler phases and now your bundle of joy is ready for their first day of Kindergarten.

You’re used to bottles and blankets, not backpacks and folders! Buying school supplies, helping with homework, and participating in school activities can be overwhelming for you and your child.

It’s a big change. Make sure you keep reading below to learn how to get them ready for the big step that is the first day of Kindergarten.

Teaching Independence

Kindergartners are expected to be able to take care of their basic needs. They should be able to change their clothes, feed themselves, and manage their bathroom needs.

You can start this process early by allowing your child to try their best and offer guidance instead of doing it for them. You’d be surprised how independent they can be with the right amount of guidance.

Conduct Your Own Research

Choosing the right school for your child is an important decision and one that isn’t easily made. Do your own research on what Kindergarten programs are offered in your area, schedule tours to see how the program operates, and reach out to other parents to gather community opinions on nearby schools.

This parenting blog hosted the outstanding go to school tips article focused on preschoolers and kindergartners.

Did this article make you feel more prepared to send your child to Kindergarten? If so, check out more in our education section! First First Day of School: How to Get Your Child Ready for Kindergarten

Giving Responsibility

In the classroom, your child will be responsible for completing worksheets, asking for help, and being a good friend to others. If your child isn’t used to having responsibilities at home, a small chore list is a good place to start. Have them be responsible for easy things that you know they can do, like picking up after themselves or cleaning their plate after a meal.

Emotional Needs

Children are balls of fleeting emotions, and one setback can lead to a monumental tantrum.

While strong emotions are expected, your child should be able to calm themselves down and begin to understand their emotions. Acknowledging your child’s feelings without berating them for how they feel and giving them language to identify their feelings (“I can see that you’re frustrated” instead of “Why are you mad?” for example) is a great step to enhance their emotional intelligence.

Attention, Attention!

Lengthening your child’s attention span will do wonders for their first year of school. Children in Kindergarten are expected to be able to remain still and quiet while the teacher, or a peer, is talking. You can start lengthening your child’s attention span at home by taking away the computer or tablet and encouraging them to try their very best on whatever work they’re focused on.

Establishing a Routine

All Kindergarten programs follow a daily routine. If your child is used to doing whatever whenever they please, starting a routine will help ease the transition from home to school.

Start waking them up at a certain time every day (yes, even on weekends) and offer snacks and lunch at certain times as well. By having a consistent routine, your child will be able to flow well within the structure of the classroom.

Beginning Literacy

As a famous aardvark once said, “Having fun isn’t hard when you have a library card.” In fact, studies have shown that children that are read at least five books a day before kindergarten have been exposed to 1.4 MILLION different words compared to children that aren’t read to.

Reading to your child is the best way to start their literacy skills, but there are few more things to work on before starting Kindergarten.

  • Recognizing the alphabet, upper and lowercase letters
  • Correct pencil grip and starting to write their name on their own
  • Being able to say their ABCs, not singing them

Beginning Mathematics

Children getting ready for Kindergarten don’t need to be prodigies to excel in mathematics. Math can be all around us, and introducing mathematical concepts can be as easy as counting 1-2-3.

Make patterns out of fruit, tell your child to do something a certain number of times, count the clouds in the sky; teaching early math doesn’t need to be as complicated as your pre-calculus class in high school. Here are a few math concepts to work on with your child before Kindergarten.

  • Counting from 1 to 10
  • Recognizing basic patterns
  • 1-1 correspondence up to 10 items
  • Sorting objects based on different classifications

Don’t Stress

What if your child isn’t able to do any of the above?

Don’t worry!

Definitely start teaching these skills at home, but the whole point of school is to learn! Each child is unique and will have things they’re great at and things that they aren’t. Kindergarten is a place to help build their skills.

  • Choosing a Kindergarten Program

Now you know the expectations of starting a Kindergarten program. It’s time to talk about the different types of programs that are offered.

Public Kindergarten Schools

Easily the most popular option, public Kindergarten schools offer a balanced curriculum accessible to everyone. The key to finding a great public school is one that focuses on team building and individual progress, rather than just passing state requirements. Find schools that incorporate hands-on learning along with a curriculum that includes social-emotional learning, like Royal Public Schools.

Private Kindergarten Schools

Private Kindergarten schools offer smaller class sizes and are not connected to state educational regulations. They have high costs of attendance and interview the children wanting to attend to ensure a good fit. The advantage is that the cost of private school correlates to more dedicated teaching staff and the small class sizes ensure that no child is left behind.

Conduct Your Own Research

Choosing the right school for your child is an important decision and one that isn’t easily made. Do your own research on what Kindergarten programs are offered in your area, schedule tours to see how the program operates, and reach out to other parents to gather community opinions on nearby schools.

Did this article make you feel more prepared to send your child to Kindergarten? If so, check out more in our education section!First First Day of School: How to Get You Child Ready for Kindergarten

Similar Articles

Comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Advertismentspot_img

Instagram

Most Popular